Storing your bike

Bike storage is an inevitable requirement whenever you buy a bicycle. You have to put the bike somewhere. But storing it outside, leaned up against the wall or locked to a fence isn't a solution; do that and you expose your ride to weather that could damage the components and impact the bike's longevity—to say nothing of making it a tempting item for theft.
Inside storage—in your house, apartment, garage, or gear shed—is preferable. From there, variations abound, from stylish wall mounts that let you display your bike as art to a simple kickstand.
Beyond finding a place for your bike to rest, you also can explore storage options like bike covers that protect your bike during long-term storage and transport on top of your vehicle.
Bikes are vulnerable to direct moisture and humidity so it's important that they're stored in a low humidity environment. If they're stored in outdoor sheds or on balconies, the moving parts will rust and the rubber will deteriorate quicker. A self-storage unit is a popular choice for bike storage, especially if you don't have a dry, protected storage space where you live. A 5×10 unit is the smallest storage unit recommended for bicycles. If you go smaller (5×5), your bike would have to be stored on an angle with all the weight on one wheel. If you're storing two or three bikes, the 5×10 would still work well. You can buy bicycle hooks at a hardware store and store your bike elevated by the frame or by the hooks. It can also safely be stored by resting on the ground. If the floors are concrete, you can put rugs or rubber mats under the wheels. If you're hanging a bike at home, be sure to buy the correct hooks for the weight of the bike. Also make sure the hooks are coated in rubber so you don't scratch your bike. Bikes can't be hung from the ceiling in storage units, but it's fine to have your bike sit on its tires while in storage. As long as the tires are inflated you should have no problem. It's also a good idea to clean your bike before putting it into storage. A good quality dish soap will do the trick. Knock away any chunks of mud, dirt and grime, especially in the drive train. Clean your chain and lubricate it to prevent rust. Also remember to cover the bike if stored in a concrete area to avoid small particles of cement dust that may compromise any moving parts.